Movie notes .

Sep. 20th, 2017 06:57 pm
sasha_feather: Black, white, and red image of woman with futuristic helmet (Sci Fi Woman)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Logan Lucky - in theaters, PG-13

A heist movie about Southern, redneck-type folks who plan and carry out a complicated robbery. Very little violence (one bar fight), little in the way of bad language, no explicit material. Pretty light, fun, and clever. Channing Tatum is the mastermind of the heist; his brother is played by Adam Driver. Daniel Craig cleary had a lot of fun playing a bomb expert with a thick Southern accent. This movie didn't have a lot of substance, but it was fun. My main irritation is that Adam Driver plays a guy with a partial arm amputation from a war wound. How much money did they spend on CGI for this, and also he took away a great opportunity for an actual disabled person to play this part. There are a couple of jokes involving the prostetic that didn't feel mean to me, but might feel mean to someone else.

Silver Linings Playbook

I loved the beginning and middle of this movie. Bradley Cooper is tremendous in it-- he takes a character that could be (and sometime is) creepy and unlikeable, and makes that character sympathetic. I liked that they showed some of the realities of mental illness. I liked the friendship between his character and Jennifer Lawrence's character. I did not like the ending, which seemed to wrap everything up in too neat of a bow-- a happily ever after sort of ending, when you know it isn't going to be so easy for anyone.

What Happened to Monday - Netflix

A dystopian film set in the near future, in an unnamed European city. People live under an oppressive government, the main crux being a strict one-child policy. Seven identical sisters live in secret, sharing one legit identity as Karen Settman. They each get to go out one day a week, the day they are named after. At the end of the day, each catches the others up on what they need to know to keep up at their high-powered job. One evening, Monday doesn't come home, and the others must find out what has happened. Noomi Rapace plays all of the sisters. It's fun to watch them being badass and fighting, but there is quite a lot of violence and mayhem. Content notes for child harm and death; violence; gore. I enjoyed this film quite a lot.

Previews

Sep. 13th, 2017 02:41 pm
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Some previews I saw at the movies yesterday:

Home Again

Reese Witherspoon plays a mom, recently separated from her husband, who hooks up with a younger guy. Events transpire, the younger guy and his friends move into her guest house; she navigates her feelings regarding her husband and her possible new, younger love interest. I think this looks cute. People have been talking about age-difference movies on Twitter, and it's nice to see one where the woman is older.

Mother!

Darren Aronofsky horror film. Not my jam.
Speaking of age differences:
Jennifer Lawrence is 27
Javier Bardem is 48
21 yr age difference

Breathe

Andrew Garfield plays a wealthy man paralyzed by polio. This could be good, or it could be ableist trash? The preview looks promising in that he uses his wealth and privlege to help other disabled people; to develop a wheelchair with a respirator attached; etc.

(no subject)

Sep. 11th, 2017 03:19 pm
mirabile: (San Francisco)
[personal profile] mirabile
Hello, hello! I hope you are all well and that hurricanes will stop hurricaning for a while. We have friends on the east coast of Florida who went to Orlando to escape Irma, but my goodness, the flooding there! We haven't heard from them since Friday so my fingers are crossed.

We are fine. Webster actually went swimming with me two mornings this week! He hasn't felt well enough to do that in months. I've been cleaning house like mad because my sister and her wife arrive Thursday night. Yay! I'm so looking forward to their visit, and of course Mother is over the moon. That's one thing she remembers, that my sister is coming out.

In case you missed all the headers and announcements, it's the OTW's tenth anniversary. Ten years! And I'm very proud to say I was there at the start. I love the OTW despite its well known faults, and I adore the AO3. Bless every volunteer and all their hard work. Anyway, Tumblr user Gins posted an essay I enjoyed: A few notes on the past ten years, and so on: I don't think it's a coincidence that there is, broadly speaking, a strong correlation between the people who would like me to write my experience of queerness and womanhood differently and the people who dismiss the artistic import and value of fannish art, and art about fandom. Fandom is one of those rare artistic communities that was built, in large part, by and for women and queer people; this is not to say there aren't people who are neither in fandom, but to instead say that womanhood and queerness have architectural significance to fandom as an artistic space. Excellent essay covering a number of subjects important to me.

Okay, lots of links to share with you:
'Plagiarists never do it once': meet the sleuth tracking down the poetry cheats: When teaching, I had the bad luck to run into a fair bit of plagiarism from my students. To this day, I wonder if I somehow didn't make clear what plagiarism was and why they shouldn't plagiarize. I've also caught some plagiarisms in fandom. It is very very unpleasant.

An essay by Cecilia Tan, Let Me Tell You, about the old saw "show, don't tell," which I have to tell you drives me wild. Literary fiction, I fear, is beyond help because of its overreliance on shared knowledge for its power. The only way to meet the literary "standard" of a "universal" story while writing about any marginalized individual -- whether by culture or subculture, whether of color, queer, or even just a woman -- is to make the story accessible to the educated white upper middle-class point of view.

Over at Think Progress I read about this incredible Twitter account, World War II, one tweet at a time. The Twitter account just started repeating after six years of tweeting, so this isn't exactly news, but you can start here and go forward. Honestly, I had no idea about most of the things that happened in September 1939. I dislike Twitter, even though I've had an account since the business started, so I keep the WW2 Tweets account up on a separate page and refresh periodically. Some days he posts many times, others just a bit. Also: my god, but the Poles were astoundingly brave! Get this: At Wizna village, 720 Polish soldiers in small forts have held back 42,000 Germans & 300 tanks for 3 days, stopping Guderian's panzer corps.

Really beautiful images and clear explanations of Cassini's jaw-dropping discoveries of Saturn's moons. (On Friday, the Cassini space probe will burn up in Saturn's atmosphere, and even though it's for SCIENCE, that still makes me sad.)

I just learned about this Kickstarter project so I didn't contribute any money, but it sounds like a hoot: Barry & Joe -- the animated series. These are the adventures of Barack Obama and Joe Biden bromancing the multiverse as they try and save us from ourselves.

Time for a little yoga, I think, and then what shall I do about dinner? Quesadillas and a salad maybe?
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
My Brother's Husband by Gengoroh Tagame
Funny and poignant with detailed, goregous art. Focused on relationships, day-to-day life; with reflections on homophobia in Japanese culture. Loved this and read it in one evening.

Star Scouts by Mike Lawrence
Adorable, funny, and imaginative story with a satisfying ending. Fairly light-hearted tale of how Avani makes alien friends in Star Scouts, goes to camp, has a rivalry with another scout, and succeeds at her goals. I really enjoyed the art. Avani is South Asian.

Both of these are appropriate for all ages.

Profile

kaaatie: (Default)
kaaatie

May 2009

S M T W T F S
     1 2
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags